Reading Reversed Cards

I love reversals. People who don’t use them insist that all the possible meanings are in a card, upright or not, but that’s a huge load to make a card (or reader) carry.

By including reversals, I only have to see half of that stuff at a time.

From the Monstarot deck

Reversals have been read a number of ways:

  1. Something opposite the core meaning
  2. The worst version of the card topic
  3. a smaller or specific aspect of the card
  4. intensifying the core meaning
  5. in protection aspect (kind warning)
  6. delay or resistance to the topic/essence
  7. fear related to the topic of the card, or placement in the spread.
  8. Not at all (every reader chooses for themselves, and have all of these element still available to them).

There are more, of course, but these are the ones I’ve run into personally.

How do you know which one it is? Read more

Kid-Friendly Tarot Decks

I’m not going to get into the nitty-gritty, here, or describe a bunch of decks in detail. This isn’t a geek-out post, though naturally opinions are still my own, and I don’t expect everyone to see things just the way I do.

This post is a picture-full starting spot for parents who are interested in introducing their kids to tarot, or even learning alongside them, without feeling the need to protect them from the images on the cards.

I know parents who are perfectly comfortable with “standard” decks, or “mild nudity” so they’re not the focus of this resource but still could find some more ideas. 🙂

One more thing: These recommendations are based only on imagery. Not all decks are equally useful for learning the system of tarot. But that list is a bit more complex, and is for another time.

I’ll mark* the decks I feel are easiest to learn from – in case you want a hint now. These fit a system, or have other helps (like key words or phrases on the card).

I am throwing bottom-limit age-suggestions at a number of decks here. However, user-compatibility is the most important thing. If the user doesn’t care about the imagery, if it doesn’t draw him or her into spending time with it, it won’t work. It’s no biggie, just a reminder that this practice – both choosing a deck and using the cards – is a terrific example of “child-led.” Read more