Judge-y Cards (Justice and Judgement)

An angel blows a trumpet as people-shaped spirits rise into the air to join her.
from Shadowscapes Tarot
Woman holding sword in one hand, balancing scales in the other.
from the Ellis Deck

Justice and Judgement might be the most-frequently compared (or questioned) pair of cards in the majors.

What I see them having in common is (the potential for) clear sight.

True justice means knowing what’s really going on. Judgement Day (the biblical one this card is based on, where sky-daddy God does accounting on all our souls) is when all the truths of our hearts are brought into the light for all to see.

But they also have very different foci, so clarity just represents their overlap.

Here are a few songs to show what I mean.

For Justice (Key 11 in most of the decks I prefer)

It’s about making distinctions. That sword you see in so many iterations of the card cuts between differences.

[“How does it feel” sung by Avril Lavigne.]

This highlighting difference can be polarizing or build understanding (The depiction of Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy in this video is a good representation of both applications).

Understanding differences is important to justice in this time, as always, because if we always “treat everyone the same” we of the dominant culture will continue to center ourselves and our view of the world (as “normal”), running the risk (or exhibiting a myopic arrogance) of not believing the lived experience of marginalized people.

Justice invites us to admit what we don’t know.

Read more

The Fool card

An Alternative Order for the Majors

One of the most interesting tarot things I’ve learned in the last month is how the majors were not originally numbered.

(That link includes the typical list, 22 cards numbered from 0-21.)

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In her book Tarot 101, Kim Huggens suggests an exercise where you re-order of the majors according to a story structure

The commonly suggested “story” of The Fool’s Journey has never worked for me as much of a story, so I loved the idea.

I took this on because she suggested a form of The Hero’s Journey – something I already have familiarity with – so it felt like a solid foundation to build on.

That link is to a version of the Hero’s Journey I wrote about some years ago. If you like to write fiction you’ll find a whole new rabbit hole to explore in that series.

What I’ve laid out here is the order I came up with based on the way I see the majors and how they line up with the pattern (Departure, Initiation, Return) as Huggens laid it out in her book.

Departure

1. Call to Adventure

image: sphynx leans on a wheel from behind, holing a up a sword in one hand
from This Might Hurt Tarot

Wheel of Fortune. The randomness of fate – often proving to be not-random (destiny).

I love the sphinx in this card for this position, and she’s surrounded by the elements: Earth, air, fire and water. You know from go this isn’t a game, and everything is involved, whether for you or against you.

2. Refusal of the Call

Image: Hermit Card
from Tarot of the Hidden Realm

The Hermit. No desire to engage. Alternatively, the hero might already be fully engaged in their current/inner world and aren’t responsive to or motivated by the call when it first appears.

After all, how many of us would respond to an outrageous demand from a stranger.

And these demands almost always seem outrageous…

3. Supernatural Aid

image: magician card
from Spellcasters Tarot

The Magician. Here we add to that story all the raw material (resources) and power.

This is the point where the hero is convinced that what needs to happen is mathematically possible: those elements mentioned in The Call? Here with the magician we see the physical representation of each of them as tools: The wand for fire, sword for air, cup for water and the pentacle for earth.

4. Crossing the First Threshold

The Fool card
from Vivid Journey Tarot

This is the fight our protagonist has to be able to enter the arena. The big change embraced, even as they don’t fully know all they’re saying yes to. Of course I saw The Fool.

I love how she’s got her little knapsack and her dog. She doesn’t have to have everything figured out before she starts, but she doesn’t have to be alone or empty-handed, either.

5. The Belly of the Whale

The Empress card
from Shadowscapes Tarot

The worst so-far – and we’re not all that far in yet. This is a form of rebirth through a death-like experience. The Empress: the power of life and death, tied up in nurture (or the withholding of it).

This is sometimes where our hero realized the stakes – how much there is to lose, which restated can also be a reminder of how much there is to fight for. Read more

Major Arcana – the fifth suit

The Fool from Tarot of the Magical Forest

These are the archetypal and original storytelling cards of the tarot.

The oldest majors have people (or humanoid) forms, even if the rest of the deck – the minors – look like the playing cards they correlate to (a repetition of the number of items listed on the card).

These 22 cards, numbered 0-21, are among the most iconic images of the tarot, including the Fool, the Magician, the Devil, the Tower and the Moon.

The Major Arcana (majors) are to the Minor Arcana (minors) as a lion is to a lynx. They both hold power, but the former are bigger and have more (cultural, story-based) associations. particularly in the Western world (starting in Europe) where they were developed.

Side note (credit to The Queer Witch Podcast where this math was first pointed out for me): Our “modern” deck did not devolve from the tarot – losing a face card and the majors along the way. A couple easily accessible sources point out where playing cards entered the historical record, and it was long before the tarot.

It’s one useful reason to call the majors the 5th suit, because its a reminder of the order.

Also, considering the early tarot examples are all European, and cards were imported before that could happen… It was an example of my own short-sightedness that I rolled with the first stories I heard about tarot coming first.

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The majors, like the minors, are usually taught in a specific order: 0-21. Read more

Pairing – comparing The Lovers and 2 of Cups

The Lovers is the sixth card in the Major Arcana. The 2 of cups is from the minors (one of the four suits I talk about here).

The main distinction many people make between the majors and the minors is how epic the event is. For example, the Lovers card represents one’s soul mate, and 2 of cups is everyday, happy-to-be-paired-with-you living.

Another way to contrast them is in intensity.

“All along it was a fever. A cold-sweat hot-headed believer.”

“Makes me feel like I can’t live without you…Round and around and around and around we go.”

[Stay, sung by Rihanna and Mikky Ekko.]

About the Lovers card, I once heard another reader say, It burns hottest, but crashes harder.

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Reversed, I see it as one of those angsty stories where the audience/reader knows they like each other, knows they’ll be perfect together, but they need to talk.

[Distance, sung by Christina Perri and Jason Mraz.]

“And I will make sure to keep my distance,
Say I love you when you’re not listening,
How long, can we keep this up?”

“And I keep waiting
For you to take me
And you keep waiting
To save what we had.” Read more

The Lovers (comparing examples)

My first set of cards to contrast are The Lovers and the 2 of cups.

Each of these cards portrays a happy pairing, and is generally considered a fortuitous card to show up in most readings.

After seeing how long this discussion can get, I’ve decided to start with a comparison between images of each individual card before I move on to the contrasts between two or more cards. (While this will make for a long series, I think it will make the most useful reference in the long-run.)

The Lovers

The Lovers, like most cards in a tarot deck, has a range of interpretations.

It can mean love, union, intense attraction, finding value, making connections (interestingly, not always lasting connections).

It represents truth, value, opposites meeting (Consider, below, the gold crown and the flower crown, both removed from the lovers’ heads in the Shadowscapes image. Or the metal lamps-post opposite the flowering tree in the Steampunk image).

It can represent hope.

It can also be interpreted as a choice-card. In older decks the third figure was sometimes a second woman, presenting the implied duality of life-choices (often with racist undertones) that the man had to choose between.

Even with current imagery you can see the choice if you look at the pairings as a meeting – sometimes with attachment, but not necessarily a commitment – one of the differences I see between this card and the 2 of cups. In this context a choice – whether to stay or leave – is still on the table.

~

In most decks you have a very obvious couple, usually male-female, and often there is a third (or more) someone looking on. Perhaps witnessing or blessing the union.

As more relationship structures and the spectrum of gender identities are acknowledged, artists have responded in different ways. For example, slightly obscuring, or allowing a question of one party’s gender. There are also the animal depictions which leave more up to the readers’ interpretations.

Sometimes the picture of the Lovers offer a twist on the traditional imagery: An interracial couple, or an active (if formal/scripted) partnership, rather than a static portrait.

Then there are the broader interpretations of artists who emphasize the first-love, core essence of the Lovers card, as seeing/accepting the self (Mermaid Tarot) and/or making room for multiple and different combinations of partners (Numinous Tarot).

All these create visual commentary as they invite us to consider – or expand – our vision of what we consider love, or value in a relationship.

Next time I’ll lay out the images for 2 of cups and we’ll start to see the overlap in art and interpretation.